Cold weather cycling

Cold Weather Cycling

It’s been cold the last week or so in Seattle.  Temperatures in the teens and 20s, which is much colder than usual for this time of year.  To be sure, it’s not Duluth or Buffalo cold, but cold in a way we’re not really set up for in Seattle.  Many older homes here, including mine, have no insulation to speak of.  And we go more in for water- and wind-proof jackets than fur-lined parkas.

If we’d had rain or snow along with the cold, I wouldn’t have kept riding to work.  Our hills, narrow streets and inexperienced drivers make it far too dangerous to take the bike out when there’s ice on the pavement.  But – as is typical when it gets this cold here – the frigid air was accompanied by crisp, clear skies (until yesterday morning, when an overnight dew made it scary-slick on the way in).

People often look askance at me for riding in this weather, but honestly, it just takes a few gear adjustments.  And riding on a dazzling clear morning beats hell out of sidling up against crowds of sniveling sickies on the bus, or idling in a car, stuck in downtown holiday shopping traffic.  Here’s how I manage it:

Hands:  I’ve tried a number of different gloves over the years, and I’m convinced there aren’t any cold weather bike gloves that perform below 40 degrees.  As I don’t really need all of the specialty padding for my 3.5 mile commute, I just throw on my ski gloves.  So much better than even my warmest pair of bike gloves.

Head:  I like my simple, thin balaclava.  Decent enough protection for the ears and neck, and can be pulled over the chin and mouth if it’s really cold and windy.  Of course, wearing a balaclava = guaranteed bad hair day. Makes mine all stand straight up.

Neck:  It sucks to hoover up cold air through the neck of your jacket while riding downhill.  Zip-up sweater, balaclava or even a scarf – they all work.  Unfortunately, I forget about my neck half the time when heading out the door.  Brr.

Body:  My ride is short.  A sweater and windproof jacket work fine.  A little cold, but fine.

Legs:  For some reason, the cold doesn’t bother my legs.  I’m in knickers year-round.

Ride: I really appreciate my fixed-gear when the weather drops below freezing.  The connected ride, all the feedback I get with each pedal stroke, makes me far more confident when riding on potentially-frozen streets.

Like someone once said, there’s no such thing as bad weather, just bad gear.  And it doesn’t take too much gear to make cold-weather riding work – at least here in Seattle.  Anyone else have any crappy-weather tips and tricks that work to keep them riding?

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